Patrick Quinn, co-founder of ice bucket challenge died aged 37

Patrick Quinn, co-founder of ice bucket challenge died aged 37

Patrick Quinn, co-founder of the ice bucket challenge died on Sunday aged 37 in the United States.

He was battling Lou Gehrig’s disease which is also called Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). This disease is related to the nervous system, it weakens muscles and impacts the physical function of a person.

In this disease, nerve cells break down, which reduces functionality in the muscles that they supply. Patrick’s campaign raised more than $220 million for medical research into amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
He was initially diagnosed with ALS on 8 March 2013.


The ALS Association credited Quinn on Sunday with helping popularise “the greatest social media campaign in history”, adding: “The Ice Bucket challenge dramatically accelerated the fight against ALS, leading to new research discoveries, expansion of care for people with ALS, and greater investment by the government in ALS research.”


Quinn’s family got condolences on social media on Sunday night, with much-expressing gratitude for the spotlight he drew to the disease and the need to find a cure. His supporters said on Facebook: “We will always remember him for his inspiration and courage in his tireless fight against ALS.”

Patrick Quinn’s Ice Bucket Challenge

A person performing ice bucket challenge by Patrick Quinn
Source



The Ice Bucket Challenge went viral on social media in the summer season of 2014.


In this challenge, people around the world posted photos and videos of themselves dumping themselves on ice water on their heads and challenging others to do the same.


This challenge is considered as research for the ALS where people accepting the challenge were regarded as donors.


In the United States, many people participated in the ALS Association, and in the UK, many people participated in the Motor Neurone Disease Association
But this challenge faced criticism because it is believed to be primarily focused on fun rather than donating money to charity.


But on August 1, 2015, a group of ALS organizations in the United States, including the ALS Association, Les Turner ALS Foundation, and ALS Therapy Development Institute, re-introduced the Ice Bucket Challenge for 2015 to raise further funds with the intention of establishing it as an annual occurrence.


According to Wikipedia, this challenge generated more than 70,000 tweets per day with hashtags such as #IceBucketChallenge, #ALSIceBucketChallenge, and #StrikeOutALS.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)



As told earlier this disease is related to the nervous system, it weakens muscles and impacts the physical function of a person. In this disease, nerve cells break down, which reduces functionality in the muscles that they supply.


This disease is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease in the United States and motor neuron disease.


According to the center of the United States which is responsible for disease control and prevention roughly 12,000 to 15,000 Americans are affected with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

According to an estimation, 5% to 10% of the ALS cases are believed to be hereditary, but the cause is unknown and there is no cure until now.


Among Patrick Quinn’s many honors for raising awareness of ALS and promoting research was a nomination with fellow ALS activist Peter Frates as Time magazine person of the year. Frates died last year aged 34, seven years after his diagnosis.

Posted by: Roastedbook.com

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